BILLS SCHOOL AND MINE - A Collection of Essays on Education


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The top main reasons why students dropout is: lack of parent engagement, poor academic performances, work or family economic needs, lack of a supportive adult, disconnected between school academics and work, not enough individualized attention, and low student engagement Good Essays words 4. In the school systems, students profit from having use of more technology.

Free Essays words 4. Through qualitative methodology; focus group, interview and ethnography, this paper explores the role of social environment on university aspirations and what social-cultural factors influence success Good Essays words 3 pages. I attended a large public school which contained students from many different diversities, however majority of the students were Caucasian and wealthy.

I am Caucasian, but I was far from being wealthy. Growing up my Dad worked at an underground limestone mine. The salary was descent meaning enough to cover the monthly bills but that was the max Good Essays words 3. The issue that many young children are facing, however, is that all of these factors can be greatly influenced by the Socioeconomic Status SES of their family We are reaching out to and serving an underserved population in Columbia and Greene Counties. The mission of our organization is to empower students with English literacy in order to enhance a better way of life and allow them to become competent members of society.

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The researches used a causal-comparative research process, to determine if socioeconomic status SES effects motivation and anxiety. Likewise, it was conducted to produce support for the authors hypothesis, regarding the benefit of specific motivational procedures and if there is a correlation between SES, motivation, and anxiety.

Essay Preview. Let me reiterate this: A full 40 percent of Earth's population is alive today because, in , a German chemist named Fritz Haber figured out how to make synthetic ammonia. Another example: Polio cases are down more than 99 percent in the past 25 years, not because the disease is going away on its own but because Albert Sabin and Jonas Salk invented polio vaccines and the world rolled out a massive effort to deliver them. Thanks to inventions like these, life has steadily gotten better.

‘Life is a process of accepting the messes and learning to clean them up.’

It can be easy to conclude otherwise—as I write this essay, more than , people have died in a civil war in Syria, and big problems like climate change are bearing down on us with no simple solution in sight. But if you take the long view, by almost any measure of progress we are living in history's greatest era. Wars are becoming less frequent. Life expectancy has more than doubled in the past century. More children than ever are going to primary school. The world is better than it has ever been.

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Dan Winters. But it is still not as good as we wish. If we want to accelerate progress, we need to actively pursue the same kind of breakthroughs achieved by Haber, Sabin, and Salk. It's a simple fact: Innovation makes the world better—and more innovation equals faster progress. That belief drives the work my wife, Melinda, and I are doing through our foundation. We went on a Safari to see wild animals but ended up getting our first sustained look at extreme poverty.

We were shocked. Of course, not all innovation is the same. We want to give our wealth back to society in a way that has the most impact, and so we look for opportunities to invest for the largest returns. That means tackling the world's biggest problems and funding the most likely solutions. That's an even greater challenge than it sounds. I don't have a magic formula for prioritizing the world's problems.

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You could make a good case for poverty, disease, hunger, war, poor education, bad governance, political instability, weak trade, or mistreatment of women. Melinda and I have focused on poverty and disease globally, and on education in the US. We picked those issues by starting with an idea we learned from our parents: Everyone's life has equal value.

If you begin with that premise, you quickly see where the world acts as though some lives aren't worth as much as others. That's where you can make the greatest difference, where every dollar you spend is liable to have the greatest impact. I have known since my early thirties that I was going to give my wealth back to society. The success of Microsoft provided me with an enormous fortune, and I felt responsible for using it in a thoughtful way. I had read a lot about how governments underinvest in basic scientific research.

I thought, that's a big mistake. If we don't give scientists the room to deepen our fundamental understanding of the world, we won't provide a basis for the next generation of innovations. I figured, therefore, that I could help the most by creating an institute where the best minds would come to do research. Courtesy of the Gates Family. There's no single lightbulb moment when I changed my mind about that, but I tend to trace it back to a trip Melinda and I took to Africa in We went on a safari to see wild animals but ended up getting our first sustained look at extreme poverty.

I remember peering out a car window at a long line of women walking down the road with big jerricans of water on their heads. How far away do these women live? Who's watching their children while they're away? That was the beginning of our education in the problems of the world's poorest people. In my father sent us a New York Times article about the million children who were dying every year from rotavirus, a disease that doesn't kill kids in rich countries.

A friend gave me a copy of a World Development Report from the World Bank that spelled out in detail the problems with childhood diseases. Melinda and I were shocked that more wasn't being done. Although rich-world governments were quietly giving aid, few foundations were doing much.

Corporations weren't working on vaccines or drugs for diseases that affected primarily the poor. Newspapers didn't write a lot about these children's deaths. This realization led me to rethink some of my assumptions about how the world improves. I am a devout fan of capitalism. It is the best system ever devised for making self-interest serve the wider interest. This system is responsible for many of the great advances that have improved the lives of billions—from airplanes to air-conditioning to computers.

Low Socio-Economic Status Students (SES) Essay -- Conselors, Education

But capitalism alone can't address the needs of the very poor. This means market-driven innovation can actually widen the gap between rich and poor. I saw firsthand just how wide that gap was when I visited a slum in Durban, South Africa, in Seeing the open-pit latrine there was a humbling reminder of just how much I take modern plumbing for granted. Meanwhile, 2. Governments don't do enough to drive innovation either.

Although aid from the rich world saves a lot of lives, governments habitually underinvest in research and development, especially for the poor. For one thing, they're averse to risk, given the eagerness of political opponents to exploit failures, so they have a hard time giving money to a bunch of innovators with the knowledge that many of them will fail.

By the late s, I had dropped the idea of starting an institute for basic research. Instead I began seeking out other areas where business and government underinvest. Together Melinda and I found a few areas that cried out for philanthropy—in particular for what I have called catalytic philanthropy.

I have been sharing my idea of catalytic philanthropy for a while now. It works a lot like the private markets: You invest for big returns. But there's a big difference. In philanthropy, the investor doesn't need to get any of the benefit. We take a double-pronged approach: 1 Narrow the gap so that advances for the rich world reach the poor world faster, and 2 turn more of the world's IQ toward devising solutions to problems that only people in the poor world face. Of course, this comes with its own challenges. You're working in a global economy worth tens of trillions of dollars, so any philanthropic effort is relatively small.

If you want to have a big impact, you need a leverage point—a way to put in a dollar of funding or an hour of effort and benefit society by a hundred or a thousand times as much.

One way you can find that leverage point is to look for a problem that markets and governments aren't paying much attention to. That's what Melinda and I did when we saw how little notice global health got in the mids. Children were dying of measles for lack of a vaccine that cost less than 25 cents, which meant there was a big opportunity to save a lot of lives relatively cheaply. The same was true of malaria. When we made our first big grant for malaria research, it nearly doubled the amount of money spent on the disease worldwide—not because our grant was so big, but because malaria research was so underfunded.

But you don't necessarily need to find a problem that's been missed. You can also discover a strategy that has been overlooked.

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BILLS SCHOOL AND MINE - A Collection of Essays on Education BILLS SCHOOL AND MINE - A Collection of Essays on Education
BILLS SCHOOL AND MINE - A Collection of Essays on Education BILLS SCHOOL AND MINE - A Collection of Essays on Education
BILLS SCHOOL AND MINE - A Collection of Essays on Education BILLS SCHOOL AND MINE - A Collection of Essays on Education
BILLS SCHOOL AND MINE - A Collection of Essays on Education BILLS SCHOOL AND MINE - A Collection of Essays on Education
BILLS SCHOOL AND MINE - A Collection of Essays on Education BILLS SCHOOL AND MINE - A Collection of Essays on Education
BILLS SCHOOL AND MINE - A Collection of Essays on Education BILLS SCHOOL AND MINE - A Collection of Essays on Education
BILLS SCHOOL AND MINE - A Collection of Essays on Education BILLS SCHOOL AND MINE - A Collection of Essays on Education

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