The Water Is Wide


Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online The Water Is Wide file PDF Book only if you are registered here. And also you can download or read online all Book PDF file that related with The Water Is Wide book. Happy reading The Water Is Wide Bookeveryone. Download file Free Book PDF The Water Is Wide at Complete PDF Library. This Book have some digital formats such us :paperbook, ebook, kindle, epub, fb2 and another formats. Here is The CompletePDF Book Library. It's free to register here to get Book file PDF The Water Is Wide Pocket Guide.

After a neighbor dies suspiciously, Brad mistakenly thinks covering it up will be for the best, As he approaches manhood, Ben Meechum struggles to win the approval of his demanding alpha male father, an aggressively competitive, but frustrated Marine pilot. Returning from the War, Noah Lark discovers his family is gone.

With a passion for fishing, Noah travels to a new town in search of a legendary great bass that has yet to be caught. On his Pat Conroy, an ambitious, slightly rebellious, idealistic teacher, accepts Bennington county SC's school board superintendent's offer to teach the all-black kids of the pauper fishery community on Yamacraw Island. Staffless 'head' mistress Brown incarnates stupidity and blind rule obedience, her didactic skills consisting in scolding and spanking her students. Pat moves heaven and earth to motivate and educate, but after finally getting through to pupils and parents, is refused contract renewal by the arch-conservative authorities.

Written by KGF Vissers. The new version, "The Water Is Wide", shows no improvement over the original. The story is simple and pleasant. A new, young, white, male teacher gets a job teaching the upper grades in a all-black elementary school on an island off the coast of South Carolina.

The principal, who teaches the junior grades, is black. She maintains discipline by beating the children. Pat Conroy does not believe in the effectiveness of corporal punishment; instead, he wins over the class with a combination of openness, honesty, humour and tough love. If you have not seen Conrack, then I could recommend this film, if you do not mind predictable films. One could probably predict the main developments from what I have already said, so I will say no more. Start your free trial. Find showtimes, watch trailers, browse photos, track your Watchlist and rate your favorite movies and TV shows on your phone or tablet!

IMDb More. Keep track of everything you watch; tell your friends. Full Cast and Crew. Release Dates.

James Taylor The Water Is Wide

Official Sites. Company Credits. Technical Specs. Plot Summary. Plot Keywords. Parents Guide. External Sites. Add Review zritelle September 12, Report. Review by David R. Adler Like 's Voice in the Night, The Water Is Wide features Charles Lloyd in the company of one of his dearest friends, drummer Billy Higgins, who would pass away less than a year after the album's release.

Guitarist John Abercrombie also remains on board, but Lloyd extends the group's generational span by recruiting two younger players: pianist Brad Mehldau and bassist Larry Grenadier.


  1. Three settings.
  2. Joan Baez:The Water Is Wide Lyrics?
  3. The Preciousness of Christ!
  4. Chinese Brush Painting Landscape Book 2 (How to Do Chinese Brush Painting).
  5. A Charmed Life (The Charmed Life).
  6. Ancient Paths to Health and Wellness.
  7. The Water Is Wide (Roud 87; Child )!

The album begins with a straightforward, elegant reading of Hoagy Carmichael's "Georgia. It's a glorious amalgam of sound: the leader's unique, glissando-laden phraseology, Mehldau's harmonic nuances, unerring rhythmic backbone from Grenadier and the majestic Higgins -- and only occasionally, pointed and eloquent guitarism from Abercrombie.

In addition, Lloyd's closing "Prayer," written for Higgins during a life-threatening episode back in , features just the composer, Abercrombie, and guest bassist Darek Oles. Oddly, Oles' credit is relegated to the fine print. Martinmass wind when wilt thou blow, and blow the green leafs of the Tree, O! Worsdale's new lyrics are worth quoting: Altho' so fondly Men profess to love us, without ranging, Their passions vary like their Dress, decaying, ever changing. No Face so fair, no Eye so bright, From roving to restrain them; As Boys, as whom gilded Toys delight, possess, and then disdain them.

But just like John Gay they both didn't use the version from Thomson's Orpheus Caledonius but instead one that suited Ramsay's 8-line double-stanzas: Allan Ramsay's text remained available throughout the 18th century, not only because the Tea-table Miscellany were reprinted regularly: saw the 18th edition. Robertson 18?? Smith 18?? Macpherson And of course it found a place in scholarly publications like The Garland of Scotia.

M'Gibbon, Oswald, Bremner, and others, have much to answer for in the matter of pseudo-embellishment of our finest old airs. We have removed from 'Waly, Waly' the absurd trappings hung about its neck by these men".

The tune is completely different and for some reason the verse with the "cockle shells" has returned: When cockle shells turn silver bells, Then will my love return to me. When roses blow, in wintry snow, Then will my love return to me. Oh, waillie! But love is bonnie A little while when it is new! But it grows old and waxeth cold, And fades away like evening dew.

The water is wide l cannot get o'er And neither have I wings to fly. O go and get me some little boat To carry o'er my true love and I. A-down in the meadows the other day, A-gath'ring flow'rs, both fine and gay, A-gath'ring flowers, both red and blue, I little thought what love could do. I put my hand into one soft bush Thinking the sweetest flow'r to find, I prick'd my finger to the bone, And left the sweetest flow'r alone.

I leaned my back up against some oak, Thinking it was a trusty tree. But first he bended and then he broke, So did my love prove false to me. Where love is planted, O there it grows, It buds and blossoms like some rose; It has a sweet and a pleasant smell, No flow'r on earth can it excel. Must I be bound, O and she go free! Must I love one that does not love me! Why should I act such a childish part, And love a girl that will break my heart. There is a ship sailing on the sea, She's loaded deep as deep can be, But not so deep as in love I am; I care not if I sink or swim.

Navigation menu

O love is handsome and love is fine, And love is charming when it is true; As it grows older it groweth colder And fades away like the morning dew. I put my hand into the bush Thinking the sweetest flower to find, I pricked my finger to the bone And leaved the sweetest flower alone. I leaned my back against some oak Thinking it was a trusty tree. First he bended, then he broke And so did my false love to me. There is a ship sailing on the sea But it's loaded so deep as deep can be, But not so deep as in love I am, I care not whether I sink or swim.

Since my love's dead and gone to rest I'll think on her who I love best. I've sewed her up in flannel strong, Have another now she's dead and gone.


  • Islam et Christianisme au miroir lun de lautre : Approches dun chrétien dAlgérie (French Edition)!
  • The Water Is Wide | Barnhouse.
  • The Circuit Designers Companion!
  • So Stop You Cant Live the Christian Life.
  • Shapes!!
  • The Pimlico Kid.
  • !
  • Sharp used two of his four verses for the extended text published in O down in the meadows the other day A-gathering flowers both rich and gay, A-gathering flowers both red and blue, I little thought what love could do. Where love is planted there do grow, It buds and blossoms just like some rose, For it has a sweet and a pleasant smell, No flower on earth can it excel.

    I fetched my back once against an oak, I thought it had been some trusty tree, For the first it bent and the next it broke, So did my love prove false to me. Must I go bound and she go free? Must I love one that don't love me? Why should I act such a childish part To love a girl that will break my heart? This is clearly a relic of a different song although Sharp apparently also regarded it as related to the old Scottish "Oh Waly, Waly" because it included a variant form of one of its stanzas: The water is wide and I can't get over Neither have I got wings to fly.

    Love is handsome, love is pretty, Love is charming when it is true; As it grows older it grows colder And fades away like the morning dew. I had two dogs under my father's table. They do prick their ears when they do hear the horn. When I'm dead, dear, it will be all over And I hope my friends will bury me.

    In London city the girls are pretty, Streets are paved with marble stones. My true lover the clever a woman As ever trod on English ground. I'm often drunk but never sober, I'm a rover in every degree.

    The Water Is Wide (TV Movie ) - IMDb

    When I'm drinking I'm always a-thinking How to gain my love's company. I had two dogs under my father's stable. When I'm dead ere it will be all over And I hope my friends will bury me. Thomas only recalled four of them: the first, the second, the sixth and the third: Down in yon Meadow fresh and gay, Picking of Flowers the other day, Picking of Lillies red and blue: I little thought what Love could do.

    Where Love is planted there it grows, It buds and blossoms much like a Rose; And has a sweet and pleasant smell, No Flower on earth can it excel. If there are thousands, thousands in a Room, My true love she carries the brightest Bloom, Sure she is some chosen one, I will have her or I'll have none. I saw a Ship sailing on the Deep, She sail'd as deep as she could swim; But not so deep as in Love I am, I care not whether it sink or swim. I set my Back against an oak, I thought it was a trusty tree, But first it bent and then it broke So did my false Love to me.

    If Roses be such prickly Flowers, They should be gather'd while they're green, And he that loves an unkind Lover, I'm sure he strives against the stream. A new love song. In the original text the rhymes worked much better: I have seven ships upon the sea, and all are laden to the brim; I am so inflam'd with love to thee, I care not whether I sink or swim. I'le rather travel into Spain, where I'le get love for love again; The compiler of this "new song" was surely well acquainted with old popular songs but his abilities as a poet left something to be desired.

    Around a slightly edited text was included in a small collection of song-texts: The Merry Songster. Being a Collection of Songs [ The first verse looks a little bit different and in the last a correct rhyme-word was inserted into the first line: Down in a Meadow both fair and gay, Plucking a Flower the other day, Plucking a Flower both red and blue, I little thought what Love could do. A new Song, [London? They are all listed in the catalogue of Scottish chapbooks on the website of the University of Glasgow: Bruce's address : to which are added, The blue cockade; Sorrow and care; The unfortunate swain, Printed and sold by C.

    Randall, Stirling The shady grove. To which are added, The maid's complaint for Jockey. Happy Lizzy, blooming maid. The lass of Primrose-hill. The unfortunate swain. She wakes, Sabina wakes, Printed by J. The happy fire-side. Vulcan's cup. The maid's complaint for Jockey, Printed by M. Randall, Stirling [ ? Advice to the fair, Printed by M.

    The only differences to the other texts were that one of the original verses was missing and that the lilies took over the main role in the first verse: Four Excellent Songs Intituled, I. Picking Lillies. The Sailor's Lamentation. Low down in the Broom. Willie is the Lad for me, [Newcastle upon Tyne? The captain's frolic. Picking lillies, 3. The distressed saillors [sic] on the rocks of Scylla.

    To which are added, Tippet is the dandyo. The toper's advice. Picking lilies. The dying swan, Printed by J. On the other hand it is impossible to say how much he has edited the tunes: Down in yon meadow fresh and gay, I was pulling flowers the other day; I was pulling flowers both red and blue, But I little knew what love could do.

    For there love's planted, and there it grows, It buds and blooms like any rose, It has such a sweet and a pleasant smell, That nought on earth can it excel. I put my band into a bush, Thinking a sweet rose there to find ; But prick'd my fingers to the bone, And left the sweetest rose behind. If roses be such prickly flowers, They should be pull'd when they are green; So he that finds an inconstant love, l'm sure he strives against the stream.

    I see a ship sailing on the sea, As heavy laden'd as she can be; But she's not so deep, as in love I am, What is't to me though she sink or swim? Must I go bound, and she go free? Must I love one that loves not me? Why should I act such a childish part, As to love a fair one that breaks my heart? And still think on her when she's dead and gone. In the informative notes three informants are credited: A ship came sailing over the sea, As deeply laden as she could be; My sorrows fill me to the brim, I care not of I sink or swim.

    I put my hands into a bush, I thought a lovely rose to find, I pricked my fingers to the bone, And left this lovely rose behind. But 'tis in vain, I wish I had my heart again, I'd lock it in a golden box, I'd fasten it with a silver chain. Ten thousand ladies in the room My love she is the fairest bloom [ Shall I play such a childish part, For woman's love to break my heart. Ten thousand lovers in the room But my true love the fairest bloom I'm sure she is the fairest one, I will have her, or else have none.

    I put my hand into a bush. It was sent to him — apparently without a text - by "Lady Lethbridge as sung by her old nurse": After the turn of the century the collectors still found more relics of the song. I leaned my back against an oak, I thought it was a trusty tree, But first it bent,then it broke, And so did my false love to me. In yonder deep there swims a ship, She swims as deep as deep can be, Not half so deep as I am in love, I little care if I sink or swim.

    The melody, by the way, is very different different from all the others we have come across so far: As I walked out one morning in May, A-gathering flowers all so gay, I gathered white and I gathered blue, But little did I know what love can do. Seven ships on the sea, Heavy loaded as they can be, Deep in love as I have been, But little do I care if they sink or swim.

    But it's only the musical phrase in first two bars that is similar while the rest of the song is very different: The same can be said about the variant of "Young Hunting" he refers to Karpeles, Appalachians, No. The first with nine verses and a chorus can be found for example on a song-sheet printed by John Pitts in London Johnson Ballads , at BBO : Many cold winters nights I've travell'd, Until my locks were wet with dew, And don't you think that I'm to blame, For changing old love for new.

    I lean'd my back against an oak, Thinking it had been some trusty tree; At first it bent and then it broke And so my false lover proved to me. In London City the girls are so pretty, The streets are paved with marble stone, And my love she is as clever a woman As ever trod on English ground. If love is handsome and love is pretty, And love is charming while its new, So as love grows older it grows colder, But fades away like the morning dew.

    I laid my head on a cask of brandy, It was my fancy I declare; For when I'm drinking I'm always thinking How I shall gain my love's company. There is two nags in my fathers stable, They prick their ears when they hear the hound; And my true love is as clever a women As ever trod on England's ground You silly sportsmen leave off your courting, I'll say no more till I have drank, For when I'm dead it will be all over, I hope my friends will bury me. Chorus: I'm often drunk, but seldom sober, I am a rover in every degree; When I'm drinking I'm often thinking How shall I gain my love's company.

    In London City, the girls are pretty, The streets are pav'd with marble stones, And my love she is as sweet a woman As ever trod upon English ground. I wish I was in Dublin city, As far as e'er my eyes could see, Or else across yonder briny ocean, Where there are no lawyers can follow me. O love is handsome and love is pretty, And love is charming while it is new, So as love grows older, it does grow colder, But fades away like the morning dew.

    I laid my head on a cask of brandy, It was my fancy as you may see; For when I'm drinking I'm always thinking How I shall gain my love's company. There is two nags in my father's stable, They prick their ears when they hear the hounds; And my true love is as neat a man [sic! I am deep in love, but I dare not show it, My heart is lock'd up in thy breast; I will plainly let the whole world know it, A troubled mind can take no rest.

    I'll lean my head on a cask of brandy, That is my fancy I do declare; For when I'm drinking, I'm always thinking, How shall I gain that young lady fair. I wish my love was one red rose, And planted down by yonder wall, And I myself was one drop of dew, That in her bosom I might fall. I wish my love and I were sailing, As far from land as one could see; Yes, sailing over the deepest waters, Where love and care would not trouble me.

    For the seas are deep, and I cannot wade them, And neither have I wings to fly; I wish I had some jolly boatman, To ferry over my love and I. I wish I was in Covel's Castle, Where the marble stones are as black as ink, Where the pretty girls they all adore me I'll sing no more until I drink. On the sheet music available at Music for the Nation: American Sheet Music, Library of Congress composer and songwriter Ned Straight is only credited as the arranger so the tune may be older and perhaps even the one used for the original "Peggy Gordon": I wish my love and I were sailing, As far from land as far can be, Far, far across the deep blue water, Where I'd have none to trouble me.

    The sea is deep, I can't swim over, Neither have I the wings to fly, But I will hire some jolly sportsman, To carry o'er my love and I. O love is warming, O love is charming, Love's quite handsome while it's new! But as love grows older, love grows colder, And fades away like the morning dew. It was all in the sweet month of April, While summer flowers were in their bloom, Trees were budding, sweet birds were singing; Times ain't with me as they have been.

    Great Jehovah, have mercy on me! My comrades, come to set me free; I never courted but one fair lady; Her name was Polly, she told me. Polly, O Polly, you are my darling! Come set yourself down awhile by me, And tell me the very reason Why I was slighted so by thee. I am in love, I dare not own it, The very pain lies on my breast; I am in love, and the whole world knows it, That a troubled mind can find no rest. I wish I was on some stormy ocean, As far from land as I could be; And sailing for some better country Where there no grief could trouble me.

    And its Kilkenny it is supposed, Where the marble stones are as black as ink; [ But no source is given there and I am inclined to think that he had simply taken it from the Journal : O the ripest of apples, they must soon grow rotten, And the warmest of love, it must soon grow cold; And young men's vows they must soon be forgotten, Look out pretty maiden, that you don't get controlled. They're like bright stars in a summer morning, They first are here and then they're gone.

    They'll tell to yon some tender story, Declare to you that they are true. Then straight away go and court some other. And that's the love they have for you. But love grows cold as love grows older, And fades away like the mountain dew. I wish that I'd a never seen him.

    Or that I'd died when I was young. To think a fair and handsome lady Was stricken by his lying tongue I wish I was a little sparrow, Had wings, and oh! I'd fly away to my false lover And when he'd ask, I would deny.

    Mainly Norfolk: English Folk and Other Good Music

    Alas, I am no little sparrow. No wings, and cannot fly so high. I'll sit me down in grief and sorrow And try to pass my trouble by. Both share the second line, here in the original text: Neither have I got wings to fly This is very similar to "No wings, and cannot fly so high" in Brown's text quoted above, to "Nor have I any wings to fly" M. If roses be such a fading flower They must be gather'd when they're green; And she that loves an unkind man, 'Tis like striving against the stream. Against the stream, love, I dare not go, Because the stream it it runs so strong; I'm deadly afraid I'm one of those, That lov'd an unkind man too long.

    I wish to Christ my babe was born, And smiling in its daddy's arms, I myself wrapt up in clay, Then should I be free from all harm. I leant my back against an oak, Thinking it a trusty tree: First it bow'd, and then it broke, And so did my false love to me. Had I but kept my apron down, My love had ne'er forsaken me, But now he walks up and down the town With a harlot, and not with me.

    What makes the Western winds to blow, to blow the green leaves from the tree? Come death, come death, and end my woe, For a maiden more, love, I ne'er can be. I cast my anchor in the sea, And it sunk doen into the land; And so did my heart in my body, When I took my false love by the hand. Love is hot, and love is cold, And love is dearer than any gold; And love is dearer than any thing, Unto my grave it will me bring.

    O when my apron it hung low, He followed me thro' frost and snow; But now I am with a child by him, He passes by and says nothing. I wish that I had ne'er been born, Since love has proved my downfall; He takes a stranger on his knee, And is not this a grief to me. I wish that my dear babe was born, And dandled on his daddy's knee, And in the cold grave did lie, And the green grass grew over me.

    Ye Christmas winds when will ye blow, And blow the green leafs off the tree? O, gentle death when you call, For of my life I'm quite weary. Unloose these chains love, and set me free, And let me at liberty; For was you hear [sic] instead of me, I'd unloose you love, and set you free. I never thought he was going to leave me, Until one day as he came in; He threw himself down and began to tell me, And then my troubles they did begin. I left my father, I left my mother, I left my brothers and sisters too; I left my home and my relations, I left them all for the sake of you.

    But as love grows older it still grows colder, And fades away like the morning dew. Come all ye fair maids, now take a warnin', Don't never heed what a young man say. He's like a star on some foggy mornin' When you think he's near, he is far away. I left my father, I left my Mother, I left my brothers and sisters, too. I left my friends and my fond dwellin', My dear young man for the sake of you. Oh, love is a teasin' and love is pleasin' And love's a pleasure when first it's new.

    But as love grows older, at length sic! I left my mother, I left my father, I left my brother and my sisters, too. I left my friends and my kind relations, I left them all for the love of you. If I'd a-knowed before I courted, That love had-a been such a killin' crime, I'd a-locked my hear in a box of gold, And tied it up with a silver twine. Oh, love is a pleasin' and love is teasin' And love's a pleasure when first it is new. They are here but soon are gone again.

    For once I had an untrue lover Which I claimed to be my own. He went right away and loved another, Leaving me to weep alone. If I had known before I loved him That his love was false to me T would have locked my heart with a key of golden And pinned it there with a silver pin.

    Karla Bonoff - The Water Is Wide Lyrics

    Oh, if I were a little sparrow And I had wings to fly, I'd fly right away to my true love's window, I'd listen what he told. But then as it is I'm no little sparrow. Neither have I wings to Hy. So I'll sit right down in my grief and sorrow, I'll sit here till I die. Why should I act such a childish part, To love a girl that will break my heart.

    Let reason rule thy wretched mind, Altho' I wink I am not blind. He loves another one he loves not me, No cares he for my company, He loves another I'll tell you why Because she has more gold than I. Gold will wast and Silver will flys, In time she may have as little as I, Had I but gold and Silver in store, He would like me as he has done before. He gave me honey mixt with gall, He gave me words and blows withal, He bought me a dilacte [sic! If I should gain my Liberty, In a short time I shall get free, I will buy me a dilacate gown to wear, Not hem'd with sorrow or stich with care.

    No Vallintine shall ev'r me see, No wanton Lad shall lie with me, No man shall come a near my ground, 'Until I see my loves health go round. Tis his healthe I mean to drink, From his arms I never will shrink, He has my heart with a free good will, And wherever he goes I will love him still. My love he is not Black but he is brown, And still he is worthy to where [sic!

    Baker used the one from the latter song: Must I be bound, or must I go free? To love a young man who never loved me? Why should I act such a childish part To love a young man with all my heart? He loves another, he loves not me, And he cares not for my company; He loves another - I'll tell you why: Because she's got more gold than I. I put my back up against an oak. Thinking it was some trusty tree, But first it bent and then it broke; And so did thy false love to me!

    I put my hand into a bush, Thinking some sweeter flower to find; I pricked my finger to the bone, Leaving that sweetest flower alone [behind]. Since roses are such prickly flowers They should be gathered when they're green; And she did court such an unkind love, I'm sure she's striving against the stream. For against the stream I dare not go, For fear that it should overflow; And not so deep in love am I! I care not whether he live or die! He gave me honey all mixed with gold [? Now if I ever gain my liberty, And that I trust I soon will be, I'll buy me a delicate gown to wear Not hemmed with sorrow nor stitched with fear.

    Now here's his health I mean to drink, And from his arms I will not slink; He hath my heart, go where he will Although he is false I must love him still. Neither will I act the childish part And marry a man that will break my heart". Must I go bound and you go free, Must I love a lad who doesn't love me, Must I be born with a so little heart, As to love a one would break my heart. I put my finger into the bush, To pluck a rose as fair as thyme, The thorn it pierced me at a touch, And so I left the rose behind.

    Somerset Folk Tune Tune and words collected by C. O waly, waly. Song, traditional words and music. Edited and arranged by R. A Somerset Folk-Song. Arranged [for S. Redman from collected version by C. Polished poetry in the text seems at times to be the work of a highly gifted poet, but actually has evolved through the folk process into one of the most beautiful, remorseful lyric statements in the body of Anglo-American folk song". And now we have arrived again at the text I have quoted in the very first chapter: The water is wide and I can't cross over, And neither have I wings to fly, Build me a boat that can carry two, And both shall row My love and I.

    There is a ship and it sails on the sea, loaded deep as deep can be, But not as deep as the love I'm in, I know not if I sink or swim.

    The Water Is Wide The Water Is Wide
    The Water Is Wide The Water Is Wide
    The Water Is Wide The Water Is Wide
    The Water Is Wide The Water Is Wide
    The Water Is Wide The Water Is Wide
    The Water Is Wide The Water Is Wide
    The Water Is Wide The Water Is Wide
    The Water Is Wide The Water Is Wide
    The Water Is Wide

Related The Water Is Wide



Copyright 2019 - All Right Reserved