From Recipients to Donors: Emerging Powers and the Changing Development Landscape


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From Recipients to Donors: Emerging powers and the changing development landscape

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  • From Recipients to Donors: Emerging powers and the changing development landscape / Emma Mawdsley;
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  • From Recipients to Donors – Emerging Powers and the Changing Development Landscape?

By using our site, you agree to our collection of information through the use of cookies. To learn more, view our Privacy Policy. Log In Sign Up. She has published on fragile states and development co-operation, EU-Africa issues and aid effectiveness. She has also worked as a consultant on development co-operation and evaluation in Africa. One should take into account, from recipients to donors, but rather have however, that this is still a very recent subject of become simultaneously donors and recipients analysis in both the academic and political arenas of development aid. In fact, the book is not economies and led by China.

It points out and capacities nor share a unique agenda.

From Recipients to Donors: Emerging Powers and the Changing Development Landscape

As Mawdsley explaining most of the current changes and rightly points out, however, this does not mean often oversimplifies more complex dynamics. These issues are more fulfil their objectives as rising powers, including in complex than the division between DAC and non- the field of development co-operation. DAC donors suggests: some of the latter do not traditionally use tied aid e. In set of new language, concepts and developmental fact, this increased openness to several flows principles. And although the definitions, volumes and instruments of development financing is and institutions of development co-operation are becoming more attractive and interesting to highly varied among these re- emerging donors, traditional donors, as their national aid budgets Mawdsley points out some common features of come under increasing pressure following the these actors, including a sense of dynamism, of global financial crisis.

Mawdsley identifies several global factors that have a The author makes no judgements about the powerful bearing on future trends and debates, quality or effectiveness of the aid provided, such as changes in the international landscape in but rather argues for an equally critical stance the new millennium, including changing neoliberal towards the re-emerging donors and development orthodoxies, the new aid paradigm or the global patterns as that towards traditional donors, financial crisis. But the book focuses mainly on asking whose interests class based, sectoral or an element that is often omitted in analysis, i.

Mawdsley argues that, regardless aspects in this regard. From Recipients to Donors weighs the positive and negative effects before concentrating on the new donors direct "development cooperation" policies and practices. Drawing on the author's rich original empirical research, while expertly condensing existing published and unpublished material, this is an essential and unique critical analysis and review for anyone with an academic or professional interest in development, aid, and international relations.

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Sort order. Aug 19, nick rated it liked it Shelves: non-fiction. Not a book for a wide audience, but anyone who is somehow involved or deeply interested in the subject of development cooperation and or international politicis should take some time to pick up a copy. Emma Mawdsley aims to correct some misconceptions on the new donors in field of development cooperation, who they are, how new they are, how they differ from traditional donor countries or DAC countries and non-DAC countries, how they are similar and what their growing prominence or at least growi Not a book for a wide audience, but anyone who is somehow involved or deeply interested in the subject of development cooperation and or international politicis should take some time to pick up a copy.

Emma Mawdsley aims to correct some misconceptions on the new donors in field of development cooperation, who they are, how new they are, how they differ from traditional donor countries or DAC countries and non-DAC countries, how they are similar and what their growing prominence or at least growing acknowledgement in the eyes of western actors has an impact on the field, theory and practice of development partnerships in particular bilateral.

If the book has one aspect it misses, it would be that there is little in depth analysis of public's attitude towards this kind of aid and solidarity their governments engage in, in both the DAC and non DAC countries even if she alludes to it near the end as a growing point of public-state interaction in many of these non DAC countries, I would have liked a bit more then the occasional reference and anecdote we get now. So what kind of misconceptions are cleared up?

For starters new vs old donor countries; it turns out most of the supposed new donor countries; China, India, Venezuela, Vietnam, Brazil, Saudi-Arabia Russia, Poland, Mexico, Cuba in fact all of the donor countries coming under increased attention and scrutiny by western "older" donors have been engaged in forms of aid, assistance and development partnerships almost as long as western donors.

India has been active in Nepal en Buthan since the ties, Vietnam sent out technical advisers to socialist African countries right after the unification of Vietnam, Cuba has been sending doctors and training doctors since the ties, Venezuela along with Mexico have been supplying cheap oil to the Caribbean decades before Chavez made it an anti imperial tool, Russia and Poland as part of the communist bloc sent out aid and advisers, Saudi-Arabia has always been a big financier of humanitarian aid for Palestine.

In short all of these supposed new donors have been donating for quite some time and still they are seen as new players on the field of development aid. Only three countries could be considered new players; South-Africa, Brazil and Thailand and even there she argues that their past regional politics makes it though to fully declare them new players. As Mawdsley points out, if anything is really new; it is the self confidence these donors show, their expansion of target countries and their demand to be taken as seriously as "older" donors. This in combination with the stronger role for the G20 that includes 11 non western states forced western commentators to finally take notice even if mostly limited to China.

The reason for this in short according to Mawdsley, is because a lot of what those countries did was not considered aid. It was seen as political tools or fake aid or irrelevant when compared to western aid. This theme of comparing western aid to these "new" donors is particularly strong when it comes to China.

Mawdsley does a great job at combating the obsession so many contemporary global politics analysis's have to reduce changing global poltics to China. Mawdsley painstakingly highlights non Chinese donor countries considered new donors while at the same time adequately engaging with various popular notions on Chinese aid and how it holds up when you work out the details. For example the criticism China get's for supporting Zimbabwe and Sudan with aid by western countries while various big western companies have been active in these countries for years or the continued Western support for the radical islamist state of Saudi-Arabia or other various loyal strong leaders.

This China obsession, according to the author, makes a lot of commentators blind for other "new" donors actions. When China was criticized for supporting the Angola state with aid, none acknowledged Brazil nor India both active in this authoritarian African petrol state and India never got any remarks on it's aid support for Sudan. It was amusing to read, as were other similarities between "new and old" donors. But the author does emphasize on several symbolic but meaningful points, old and new differ; one that struck a cord with me was the insistence of China that their personal should not be paid or treated any different from locals with the same status.

From Recipients to Donors: Emerging Powers and the Changing Development Landscape

I readily agreed with the psychological impact for Africans to see Chinese doctors arriving to field hospitals in old jeeps when their UN colleagues arrived with chauffeurs in brand new all terrain vehicles. But why this attention to aid? All things considered aid rarely makes to the headlines but as Mawdsley shows, aid and the role "new" donors give it is one of self confidence.

The ability to help others is a sign of both strength as it is of solidarity and useful in soft power for strengthening bonds and cooperation between states on other issues. Considering the weight these emerging economies and the partners they have give to these partially politically symbolic and partially relevant forms of support; it would be unwise to dismiss aid as a mere afterthought to the big issues. India, China, SA, Brazil and the others use it to send a message and to spread a certain point of view, a political option, this in particular is what sets western states and observers on edge but this is precisely evidence of the continued western dominance that it's messages and aid are to be considered apolitical while those of India and China are only self-serving.

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But Mawdsley does not side with China and India on this issue; she questions the west for it's insistence on it's own message of apolitical honest aid while at the same time casting doubt whether China and India's rhetoric of south-south solidarity merely serves a purpose of hiding other motivations or if it truly is substantially different in practice as it is claimed to be in theory. In the end her point seems to be that both sides have other motives and political agendas with other narratives to color them, accepting this and that China, India and the others new donors will simply not adapt practices and words deemed correct by the western dominated donors and multilateral organisations such as the IMF and world bank.

The future of aid as she guessed correctly, will be changes in the way aid is constructed as a political bond between states, a smaller emphasis on poverty reducing interventions, a bigger insistence on development aid to support economic growth and the finding of niches for donors old and new such as Brazil's claimed expertise on social policies for invigorating urban slums, India's adaptable affordable available approach to innovation or China's focus on key infrastructure.

From Recipients to Donors: Emerging Powers and the Changing Development Landscape From Recipients to Donors: Emerging Powers and the Changing Development Landscape
From Recipients to Donors: Emerging Powers and the Changing Development Landscape From Recipients to Donors: Emerging Powers and the Changing Development Landscape
From Recipients to Donors: Emerging Powers and the Changing Development Landscape From Recipients to Donors: Emerging Powers and the Changing Development Landscape
From Recipients to Donors: Emerging Powers and the Changing Development Landscape From Recipients to Donors: Emerging Powers and the Changing Development Landscape
From Recipients to Donors: Emerging Powers and the Changing Development Landscape From Recipients to Donors: Emerging Powers and the Changing Development Landscape

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